FreeBSD

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FreeBSD

FreeBSD is a free and open source Unix-like operating system for x86 (both 32 and 64 bit), ARM, AArch64, RISC-V, POWER, and PowerPC computers.

FreeBSD is based on BSD, the 4.4BSD-Lite release, from Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) at the University of California at Berkeley, is used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms. FreeBSD has been known for its web serving capabilities.

Its goal is to provide a stable and fast general-purpose operating system that can be used for any purpose with no strings attached, with High Performance and Ease of Use to the end user.

It is a favorite among web content providers. It runs on PCs and Alpha processors from Compaq, currently owned by Hewlett-Packard.

The FreeBSD project has a significantly larger number of users than the other BSD projects.


Features
  • Liberal Open Source license (BSD-2-clause license), which grants you rights to freely modify and extend its source code and incorporate it in both Open Source projects and closed products without imposing restrictions typical to copyleft licenses, as well as avoiding potential license incompatibility problems.
  • Strong TCP/IP networking - FreeBSD implements industry standard protocols with ever increasing performance and scalability.
    • This makes it a good match in both server, and routing/firewalling roles - and indeed many companies and vendors use it precisely for that purpose.
  • Fully integrated OpenZFS support, including root-on-ZFS, ZFS Boot Environments, fault management, administrative delegation, support for jails, FreeBSD specific documentation, and system installer support.
  • Extensive security features, from the Mandatory Access Control framework to Capsicum capability and sandbox mechanisms.
  • Over 30 thousand prebuilt packages for all supported architectures, and the Ports Collection which makes it easy to build your own, customized ones.
  • Documentation - in addition to the Handbook and books from different authors that cover topics ranging from system administration to kernel internals, there are also the man(1) pages, not only for userspace daemons, utilities, and configuration files, but also for kernel driver APIs (section 9) and individual drivers (section 4).
  • Simple and consistent repository structure and build system - FreeBSD uses a single repository for all of its components, both kernel and userspace. This, along with a unified and easy to customize build system and a well thought-out development process makes it easy to integrate FreeBSD with build infrastructure for your own product.
  • Staying true to Unix philosophy, preferring composability instead of monolithic "all in one" daemons with hardcoded behavior.
  • Binary compatibility with GNU/Linux, which makes it possible to run many GNU/Linux binaries without the need for virtualisation.

History of FreeBSD

The FreeBSD Project had its genesis in the early part of 1993, partially as the brainchild of the Unofficial 386BSDPatchkit’s last 3 coordinators: Nate Williams, Rod Grimes and Jordan Hubbard.

The original goal was to produce an intermediate snapshot of 386BSD in order to fix a number of problems that the patchkit mechanism was just not capable of solving. The early working title for the project was 386BSD 0.5 or 386BSD Interim in reference to that fact.

386BSD was Bill Jolitz’s operating system, which had been up to that point suffering rather severely from almost a year’s worth of neglect. As the patchkit swelled ever more uncomfortably with each passing day, they decided to assist Bill by providing this interim "cleanup" snapshot. Those plans came to a rude halt when Bill Jolitz suddenly decided to withdraw his sanction from the project without any clear indication of what would be done instead.

The trio thought that the goal remained worthwhile, even without Bill’s support, and so they adopted the name "FreeBSD" coined by David Greenman. The initial objectives were set after consulting with the system’s current users and, once it became clear that the project was on the road to perhaps even becoming a reality, Jordan contacted Walnut Creek CDROM with an eye toward improving FreeBSD’s distribution channels for those many unfortunates without easy access to the Internet. Walnut Creek CDROM not only supported the idea of distributing FreeBSD on CD but also went so far as to provide the project with a machine to work on and a fast Internet connection. Without Walnut Creek CDROM’s almost unprecedented degree of faith in what was, at the time, a completely unknown project, it is quite unlikely that FreeBSD would have gotten as far, as fast, as it has today.

The first CD-ROM (and general net-wide) distribution was FreeBSD 1.0, released in December of 1993. This was based on the 4.3BSD-Lite ("Net/2") tape from U.C. Berkeley, with many components also provided by 386BSD and the Free Software Foundation. It was a fairly reasonable success for a first offering, and they followed it with the highly successful FreeBSD 1.1 release in May of 1994.

Around this time, some rather unexpected storm clouds formed on the horizon as Novell and U.C. Berkeley settled their long-running lawsuit over the legal status of the Berkeley Net/2 tape. A condition of that settlement was U.C. Berkeley’s concession that three files of Net/2 were "encumbered" code and had to be removed as they were the property of Novell, who had in turn acquired it from AT&T some time previously. What Berkeley got in return was Novell’s "blessing" that the 4.4BSD-Lite release, when it was finally released, would be declared unencumbered and all existing Net/2 users would be strongly encouraged to switch. This included FreeBSD, and the project was given until the end of July 1994 to stop shipping its own Net/2 based product. Under the terms of that agreement, the project was allowed one last release before the deadline, that release being FreeBSD 1.1.5.1.

FreeBSD then set about the arduous task of literally re-inventing itself from a completely new and rather incomplete set of 4.4BSD-Lite bits. Although only three files having to do with System V shared memory and semaphores were removed, many other changes and bug fixes had been made to the BSD distribution, so it was a huge task to merge all the FreeBSD developments into 4.4BSD-Lite. It took the project until November of 1994 to make this transition, and in December it released FreeBSD 2.0 to the world. Despite being still more than a little rough around the edges, the release was a significant success and was followed by the more robust and easier to install FreeBSD 2.0.5 release in June of 1995.

Since that time, FreeBSD has made a series of releases each time improving the stability, speed, and feature set of the previous version.

FreeBSD Overview

Items Information & References


Based on Independent


Developer The FreeBSD Project


First release 1.0, 01/11/1993


Origin International


Architecture FreeBSD supports several processor architectures: x86-64, ARM64, ARM32, IA-32, PowerPC and RISC-V.


Package manager • pkg


License BSD-2-clause license ("Simplified BSD License" or "FreeBSD License")


Website www.freebsd.org


Documentation docs.freebsd.org

FreeBSD Releases History

FreeBSD Releases History
Version[1] Release[2]
1.0[3] 01/11/1993
1.1[4] 05/1994
1.1.5[5][6]
1.1.5.1[7][8] 07/1994
2.0[9][10] 22/11/1994
2.0.5[11][12] 10/06/1995
2.1[13][14] 19/11/1995
2.1.5[15][16] 07/1996
2.1.6[17][18] 12/1996
2.1.7[19][20] 02/1997
2.2[21][22] 03/1997
2.2.1[23] 04/1997
2.2.2[24] 05/1997
2.2.5[25][26] 22 /10/1997
2.2.6[27][28] 25/03/1998
2.2.7[29][30] 22/07/1998
2.2.8[31][32] 29/11/1998
3.0[33][34] 16/10/1998
3.1[35][36] 15/02/1999
3.2[37][38] 17/05/1999
3.3[39][40] 17/09/1999
3.4[41][42] 20/12/1999
3.5[43][44] 24/06/2000
4.0[45][46] 14/03/2000
4.1[47][48] 27/07/2000
4.1.1[49][50] 27/09/2000
4.2[51][52] 21/11/2000
4.3[53][54] 20/04/2001
4.4[55][56] 20/09/2001
4.5[57][58] 29/01/2002
4.6[59][60] 15/06/2002
4.6.2[61][62] 15/08/2002
4.7[63][64] 10/10/2002
4.8[65][66] 03/04/2003
4.9[67][68] 28/10/2003
4.10[69][70] 27/05/2004
4.11[71][72] 25/01/2005
5.0[73][74] 14/01/2003
5.1[75][76] 09/06/2003
5.2[77][78] 09/01/2004
5.2.1[79][80] 25/02/2004
5.3[81][82] 06/11/2004
5.4[83][84] 09/05/2005
5.5[85][86] 25/05/2006
6.0[87][88] 04/11/2005
6.1[89][90] 08/05/2006
6.2[91][92] 15/01/2007
6.3[93][94] 18/01/2008
6.4[95][96] 28/11/2008
7.0[97][98] 27/02/2008
7.1[99][100] 04/01/2009
7.2[101][102] 04/05/2009
7.3[103][104] 23/03/2010
7.4[105][106] 24/02/2011
8.0[107][108] 25/11/2009
8.1[109][110] 23/07/2010
8.2[111][112] 24/02/2011
8.3[113][114] 18/04/2012
8.4[115][116] 07/06/2013
9.0[117][118] 12/01/2012
9.1[119][120] 30/12/2012
9.2[121][122] 30/09/2013
9.3[123][124] 16/07/2014
10.0[125][126] 20/01/2014
10.1[127][128] 14/11/2014
10.2[129][130] 13/08/2015
10.3[131][132] 28/03/2016
10.4[133][134] 03/10/2017
11.0[135][136] 10/10/2016
11.1[137][138] 26/07/2017
11.2[139][140] 28/06/2018
11.3[141][142] 09/07/2019
11.4[143][144] 23/06/2020
12.0[145][146] 11/12/2018
12.1[147][148] 04/11/2019
12.2[149][150] 27/10/2020
12.3[151][152] 07/12/2021
12.4[153][154] 05/12/2022
13.0[155][156] 13/04/2021
13.1[157][158] 16/05/2022
13.2[159][160] 11/04/2023
14.0[161][162] 23/10/2023

FreeBSD based distributions

FreeBSD based distributions
Note
  • NanoBSD: This is a shell script (/usr/src/tools/tools/nanobsd/) that generates an embedded FreeBSD image (for embedded applications), suitable for use on a USB stick, memory card, or other storage medium.[163]

NanoBSD is a tool developed by Poul-Henning Kamp and now maintained by Warner Losh. It creates a FreeBSD system image for embedded applications, suitable for use on a USB key, memory card or other mass storage media.

It can be used to build specialized install images, designed for easy installation and maintenance of systems commonly called "computer appliances". Computer appliances have their hardware and software bundled in the product, which means all applications are pre-installed. The appliance is plugged into an existing network and can begin working (almost) immediately.

Active FreeBSD Operating Systems

  1. BSDRP (BSD Router Project), is a Free and open source software router distribution based on embedded FreeBSD 12-STABLE using NanoBSD, with FRRouting and Bird.
  2. CheriBSD, CheriBSD extends FreeBSD to implement memory protection and software compartmentalization features supported by the CHERI ISA. CheriBSD includes support for CHERI extensions to the RISC-V and Arm/Morello architectures.
  3. CellOS: Is the base operating system used by Sony for the PlayStation 3 is a fork of both FreeBSD and NetBSD known internally as CellOS or GameOS. The native operating system of the PlayStation 3 is CellOS, which is believed to be a fork of FreeBSD; TCP/IP stack fingerprinting identifies a PlayStation 3 as running FreeBSD, and the PlayStation 3 is known to contain code from FreeBSD and NetBSD.
  4. Darwin: Is the core Unix operating system of macOS. It is composed of code derived from NeXTSTEP, FreeBSD, other BSD operating systems, Mach kernel, and other free software projects's code, as well as code developed by Apple.
  5. DragonFly BSD, a derivative or fork of FreeBSD version 4.8, dated June 2003. This distro-BSD rewrote all concurrency management, Symmetric multiprocessing (SMP), and most of the kernel subsystems).
  6. DynFi Firewall: DynFi is a firewall platform based on FreeBSD. The project provides utilities for VPN, IDS, proxy, anti-virus, and packet filtering. Support is provided in several languages, including French, English, and German. DynFi is designed to be deployed on both physical hardware and in virtual environments.
  7. GhostBSD, GhostBSD is an operating system aimed at desktop and laptop computers. It aims to combine the stability and security of FreeBSD with OpenRC, operating system packages and the graphical user interface of MATE.
  8. HardenedBSD, a fork of FreeBSD with enhanced security, implementing security and exploit mitigation technologies in addition to FreeBSD.
  9. helloSystem, a desktop system for creators that focuses on simplicity, elegance and ease of use.
  10. Junos OS, is the embedded operating system for routers used by Juniper Networks.
  11. MidnightBSD, forked from FreeBSD in the FreeBSD 6.1 Beta release.
  12. NomadBSD, is a persistent LiveCD system for USB flash drives, based on FreeBSD. Along with automatic hardware detection and configuration, it is configured to be used as an out-of-the-box desktop system, but can also be used for data recovery, educational purposes, or to test FreeBSD hardware compatibility.
  13. OneFS OS, is the EMC Isilon operating system, the operating system of the EMC Isilon, which controls and manages the OneFS (OneFS distributed file system).
  14. Orbis OS, is the PlayStation 4 operating system.
  15. OS108
  16. PenBSD
  17. ravynOS, is a BSD operating system project that aims to provide an experience like and some compatibility with macOS (formerly known as airyxOS).[164][165][166]
  18. StarBSD, is a server-oriented operating system based on FreeBSD for mission-critical enterprise environments.
  19. TrueNAS, ex FreeNAS'
  20. ULBSD, is a desktop-oriented operating system based on FreeBSD. It aims to be easy to install and ready to use immediately by providing a pre-installed KDE 5 graphical user desktop environment.
  21. UTUTO XS GNU/BSD.
  22. XigmaNAS, formerly NAS4Free, is an open source embedded NAS (Network Attached Storage) operating system based on FreeBSD. It is a continuation of the original FreeNAS/TrueNAS code.
  23. Zrouter, is a FreeBSD based operating system firmware for embedded devices.

Discontinued FreeBSD Operating Systems

  1. AsyncOS, IronPort's operating system
  2. AskoziaPBX
  3. BSDBox
  4. BSDeviant, was a 210MB LiveCD, with Fluxbox as window manager.
  5. BSDLive
  6. Bzerk
  7. ClonOS, offered a complete web user interface to easily control, deploy and manage Bhyve/Xen hypervisor virtual environments, containers and FreeBSD jails.
  8. ClosedBSD, a firewall operating system that can be booted from cdrom, compact flash memory or floppy disk.
  9. Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, operating system run by the Debian project, uses the FreeBSD kernel modified to work with GNU libraries.
    • Ging, is a LiveCD based on Debian GNU7kFreeBSD, acronym for Ging Is Not Ging.
  10. DesktopBSD, was a desktop-oriented operating system based on FreeBSD using KDE 3.5.
  11. EclipseBSD
  12. evoke, formerly DamnSmallBSD; was a small (50mb or less) live FreeBSD environment aimed at developers and system administrators. The goal was to be able to run on both legacy hardware and modern machines while providing a responsive system. It supported both SMP and uniprocessor machines. DSBSD came with the Fluxbox window manager, Firefox, XMMS, an SSH server, a mini web server, a VNC viewer, etc.
  13. FenestrOS BSD
  14. FreeBSD LiveCD
  15. FreeSBIE, was a BSD operating system in LiveCD mode. Since version 1.1.2 it incorporated the BSD Installer, created by the DragonFly BSD distribution.
  16. Frenzy, a portable system administrator's toolkit. It typically contains software for hardware testing, filesystem verification, security verification, and network configuration and analysis.
  17. FuryBSD, it was discontinued in 2020. It paid homage to desktop BSD projects of the past such as PC-BSD and TrueOS with its graphical interface and adds additional tools such as a LiveCD/LiveUSB/LiveDVD hybrid.
  18. Gentoo/FreeBSD, Gentoo/*BSD was a subproject to port features from Gentoo like Portage to the FreeBSD operating system.
  19. GuLIC-BSD, made by the Grupo de Usuarios de Linux de Canarias.
  20. HeX
  21. MaheshaBSD, the first version of was released in 2010. MaheshaBSD-1.0 was based on FreeBSD 8.0 and 9.0-RELEASE. LiveCD or modular toolkit based on a USB stick, which includes an anonymous browsing capability using Tor. The author also created NetBSD LiveUSB - MaheshaNetBSD and DragonFlyBSD LiveUSB - MaheshaDragonFlyBSD. A LiveCD can be created from all these USB distributions by running the /makeiso script in the root (/) directory.
    • MaheshaBSD Server, is a server version of MaheshaBSD, which includes WordPress, MySQL, phpMyAdmin, etc.This version is only available as a USB image (FreeBSD 9.0-RELEASE).
  22. miniBSD, developed a set of scripts aimed at shrinking the already installed FreeBSD system (binaries, libraries, configuration files, etc.) into a small image of about 15MB. This image can be used as a FreeBSD system on a flash drive or other flash devices, as well as to build routers, firewalls, etc.
  23. m0n0wall, was an integrated firewall operating system based on FreeBSD. It provided a small image that could be placed on Compact Flash cards, as well as CD-ROMs and hard disks. It ran on various embedded platforms and generic PCs.
  24. NetBoz, discontinued project in LiveCD format used as a firewall.
  25. NextBSD (ex FreeBSD X), was an operating system based on the FreeBSD-CURRENT kernel with additions of Mach IPC, Libdispatch, Noticed, Asld, Launchd and other components derived from Apple's open source code for OSX.
  26. Nokia IPSO (ex Check Point IPSO) - Nokia's Internet Protocol|IP security applications
  27. SCO OpenServer 10
  28. PacBSD, ex Arch BSD, lightweight operating system that aimed to bring the flexibility and philosophy of Arch Linux to BSD-based operating systems. The Project has been inactive since 2017.
  29. Paxym, is an operating system based on FreeBSD for Cavium Networks OCTEON.
  30. PicoBSD, was a FreeBSD 3.0-current version, contained on a single floppy disk.
  31. RaspBSD
  32. RelaxBSD
  33. RoFreeSBIE, was a Live operating system created with FreeSBIE scripts, and DesktopBSD installer, and KDE desktop environment.
  34. Snarl (FreeBSD)
  35. The Dark Star, was a LiveCD, based on FreeBSD 6, with FreeSBIE's /etc/rc.d scripts and created from SLAX's Linux Live Scripts system.
  36. TheWall
  37. ThinBSD
  38. TinyBSD
  39. TrianceOS
  40. TrueBSD
  41. TrueOS, formerly PC-BSD and PC/BSD, was a desktop-oriented operating system based on FreeBSD and based on ZFS boot environments, Lumina (desktop environment) and the sysadm administration framework; reinvented as Trident OS on top of Void Linux, it retained a lot of BSD aesthetics.
  42. TrustedBSD, many of its extensions were integrated into FreeBSD. The only activity on the trustbsd discussion mailing list is spam (as of 12/22/2020).
  43. WarBSD
  44. WiBSD
  45. WiFiBSD
  46. XORP


DragonFly BSD

DragonflyBSD is a free and open source Unix-like operating system forked from FreeBSD 4.8, in June of 2003, by Matthew Dillon, focused on performance and optimization. From a performance perspective DragonFly's only real competitor these days is GNU/Linux.


Features

It contains a bunch of useful features which sets it apart from other BSD/Linux-based operating systems, one being HAMMER - it's own high-performance filesystem with built-in mirroring and historic access functionality.

Other features include:

  • Virtual kernels providing the ability to run a full-blown kernel as a user process for the purpose of managing resources or for accelerated kernel development and debugging
  • Token-based synchronisation mechanism for it's kernel, in turn allowing for DragonflyBSD to parallelize the system with less effort compared to other kernels, which primarily use hard mutex locks.
  • Optimised for SSD usage by utilising a swapcache.
  • Instant readable/writeable snapshots

History of DragonFly BSD

Matthew Dillon began working on DragonFly BSD in June 2003 and announced it on the FreeBSD mailing lists on 16 July 2003.

DragonFly got started after the then FreeBSD contributor Matthew Dillon (an Amiga developer in the late 1980s and early 1990s and FreeBSD developer between 1994 and 2003) was seized from his commit bit, due to technical disagreements about how threading and SMP (symmetric multiprocessing) should be done in FreeBSD 5.x , he then proceeded to fork FreeBSD 4.8, and created DragonFly.

While initially focusing on correcting the SMP code, intended as the logical continuation of the FreeBSD 4.x series, DragonFly has diverged significantly from FreeBSD, have since became a general cleanup and simplification of all kernel subsystems, to be able to fit their place in a single system image clustering system, inventing LWKT (Light Weight Kernel Threads) and HAMMER and HAMMER2 along their way to help reach their clustering system goal. Many design concepts were influenced by AmigaOS.

DragonFly BSD Overview

Items Information & References


Based on FreeBSD 4.8 and later


Developer Matthew Dillon


First release 1.0, 12/07/2004


Origin International


Architecture DragonFly BSD supports the architecture x86-64


Package manager • pkg


Website www.dragonflybsd.org
DragonFly BSD Releases History
DragonFly BSD Releases History
Version Release Date
1.0 12/07/2004, based on FreeBSD 4.8.[167][168]
1.0A 14/07/2004
1.2.0 08/04/2005
1.2.1 22/04/2005
1.2.2 09/05/2005
1.2.3 29/06/2005
1.2.4 07/07/2005
1.2.5 31/07/2005
1.2.6 09/10/2005
1.4.0 07/01/2006
1.4.4 23/04/2006
1.6.0 24/07/2006
1.8.0 30/01/2007
1.8.1 27/03/2007
1.10.0 06/08/2007
1.10.1 21/08/2007
1.12.0 26/02/2008
1.12.1 08/03/2008
1.12.2 20/04/2008
2.0.0 20/07/2008
2.0.1 27/09/2008
2.2.0 17/02/2009
2.2.1 26/04/2009
2.4.0 16/09/2009
2.4.1 01/10/2009
2.6.1 06/04/2010
2.6.2 21/04/2010
2.6.3 07/05/2010
2.8.2 30/10/2010
2.10.1 26/04/2011
3.0.1 22/02/2012
3.2.1 02/11/2012
3.4.1 29/04/2013
3.4.2 27/05/2013
3.4.3 26/08/2013
3.6.0 25/11/2013
3.6.1 21/02/2014
3.6.2 09/04/2014
3.8.0 04/06/2014
3.8.1 16/06/2014
3.8.2 06/08/2014
4.0.0 23/11/2014
4.0.1 25/11/2014
4.2.0 29/06/2015
4.2.1 01/07/2015
4.2.3 13/07/2015
4.2.4 10/08/2015
4.4.1 07/12/2015
4.4.2 16/02/2016
4.4.3 19/04/2016
4.6.0 02/08/2016
4.6.1 17(10/2016
4.6.2 04/04/2017
4.8.0 27/03/2017
4.8.1 02/08/2017
5.0.0 16/10/2017
5.0.1 06/11/2017
5.0.2 04/12/2017
5.2.0 10/04/2018
5.2.1 21/05/2018
5.2.2 18/06/2018
5.4.0 03/12/2018
5.4.1 24/12/2018
5.4.2 22/04/2019
5.4.3 20/05/2019
5.6.0 17/06/2019
5.6.1 19/06/2019
5.6.2 11/08/2019
5.6.3 10/03/2020
5.8.0 03/03/2020
5.8.1 06/05/2020
5.8.2 23/09/2020
6.0.0 10/05/2021
6.0.1 12/10/2021
6.2.1 09/01/2022
6.2.2 09/06/2022
6.4.0 30/12/2022
Active DragonFly BSD Derivatives
  1. Gentoo/DragonFlyBSD, Gentoo/*BSD subproject to port Gentoo features such as Portage to the DragonFly BSD operating system.
Discontinued DragonFly BSD Derivatives
  1. FireFly BSD: It was a commercially-supported operating system based DragonFlyBSD. It included the complete source code and binaries for the kernel, compiler, libraries and user utilities. In addition, thousands of contributed programs were ported to Firefly BSD and are included in the 4-CDROM set. Allowed a choice of KDE 3 or Gnome 2 graphical environments on top of XFree86-4.4.0. Ability to run Microsoft Windows network drivers to support an even wider range of network devices. The project developer was David Rhodus.
  2. MaheshaDragonFlyBSD, a free general-purpose distribution of DragonFlyBSD on USB. It was based on DragonFlyBSD 3.2.1.


FreeSBIE

FreeSBIE is a discontinued BSD Operating System based on FreeBSD'[169][170].

  • FreeSBIE 1.0 was based on FreeBSD 5.2.1 and released on 27/02/2004.
Active FreeSBIE Operating Systems
  1. HamFreeSBIE, based on FreeSBIE, LiveCD] which has tools for amateur radio operators[171].
Discontinued FreeSBIE Operating Systems
  1. LiveBSD based on FreeBSD which includes the BSD Installer.


m0n0wall

m0n0wall, is a discontinued and integrated firewall Operating Systems of FreeBSD.

It provided a small image that could be placed on Compact Flash cards, as well as CD-ROMs and hard disks. It ran on various embedded platforms and generic PCs. It runs a web server (thttpd) and all configuration is done via the web.

The start-up scripts have been replaced by PHP scripts.[172].

Active m0n0wall Operating Systems
  1. pfSense, is a firewall adapted for use as a firewall and router. It uses pf, the Packet Filter from the OpenBSD project.


pfSense

pfSense, is a distribution based on m0n0wall, which was based on FreeBSD.

Active pfSense Operating Systems
  1. OPNsense, is a FreeBSD-based firewall designed for use as a firewall and router that forked from pfSense.


PicoBSD

PicoBSD is a discontinued Operating Systems based on FreeBSD.

Discontinued PicoBSD Operating Systems
  1. CBSS[173]
  2. theWall[174]


TrueOS

TrueOS, (ex PC-BSD & PC/BSD), is a discontinued Operating Systems based on FreeBSD.

Discontinued TrueOS Operating Systems
  1. Project Trident[175][176], (until 202, when the first version based on Void Linux was released).[177]
  2. GhostBSD, from 2018 version[178] until 2021[179], with the discontinuation of TrueOS, GhostBSD switched back to FreeBSD.[180][181]


References


  1. Release Engineering Information - The FreeBSD Project
  2. Release Information - The FreeBSD Project
  3. FreeBSD 1.0 RELEASE
  4. FreeBSD 1.1 RELEASE
  5. Release Notes - FreeBSD 1.1.5
  6. What's new - FreeBSD 1.1.5
  7. FreeBSD 1.1.5.1 - Announce
  8. What's new - FreeBSD 1.1.5.1
  9. FreeBSD 2.0 - Anuncio
  10. FreeBSD 2.0 - Notas de lanzamiento
  11. FreeBSD 2.0.5 Anuncio
  12. FreeBSD 2.0.5 What's new
  13. FreeBSD 2.1 - Anuncio
  14. FreeBSD 2.1 - What's new
  15. FreeBSD 2.1.5 - Anuncio
  16. FreeBSD 2.1.5 - What's new
  17. FreeBSD 2.1.6 - Anuncio
  18. FreeBSD 2.1.6 - What's new
  19. FreeBSD 2.1.7 - Anuncio
  20. FreeBSD 2.1.7 - Novedades
  21. FreeBSD 2.2 - Anuncio
  22. FreeBSD 2.2 - Novedades
  23. FreeBSD 2.2.1 - Novedades
  24. FreeBSD 2.2.1 - Novedades
  25. FreeBSD 2.2.5 - Anuncio
  26. FreeBSD 2.2.5 - Novedades
  27. FreeBSD 2.2.6 - Anuncio
  28. FreeBSD 2.2.6 - Novedades
  29. FreeBSD 2.2.7 - Anuncio
  30. FreeBSD 2.2.7 - Novedades
  31. FreeBSD 2.2.8 - Anuncio
  32. FreeBSD 2.2.8 - Novedades
  33. FreeBSD 3.0 - Anuncio
  34. FreeBSD 3.0 - Novedades
  35. FreeBSD 3.1 - Anuncio
  36. FreeBSD 3.1 - Novedades
  37. FreeBSD 3.2 - Anuncio
  38. FreeBSD 3.2 - Novedades
  39. FreeBSD 3.3 - Anuncio
  40. FreeBSD 3.3 - Novedades
  41. FreeBSD 3.4 - Anuncio
  42. FreeBSD 3.4 - Novedades
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  163. /FreeBSD / - Introduction to NanoBSD
  164. / ravynOS / - Website
  165. / ravynOS / - Github
  166. / ravynOS / - Wiki
  167. /DragonFly BSD/ History of DragonFly BSD
  168. /DragonFly BSD/ Annoucning DragonFly BSD!
  169. FreeSBIE website
  170. FreeSBIE - DistroWath.com
  171. www.db.net/hamfreesbie/HamFreeSBIE.html
  172. /m0n0wall/ Los Fork’s FreeBSD (in spanish)
  173. CBSS - ArchiveOS.org
  174. theWall - ArchiveOS.org
  175. /Project Trident/ website
  176. Trident en ArchiveOS.org
  177. /Project Trident/ Project Trident > Heritage
  178. /GhostBSD/ GhostBSD 18.10 Release Announcement
  179. /GhostBSD/ GhostBSD 21.01.20 Release Announcement
  180. TrueOS has been discontinued
  181. web.archive.org - FreeBSDNews.com